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  • Senior Core Seminar

    Course Descriptions

     

    Common Core Seminar Description:
    CORE or Discipline Specific 479 CORE: What Truths have we Learned?  

    3 credits
    This is a capstone course for the major which also represents the culmination of ODU‘s core seminars. All sections of the seminar listed below will extend the discussion of human nature, common good, and justice to address the question, 'What Truths have we Learned?' in the context of a major area of study. While each section will approach the question of the seminar from a unique perspective, all sections share common learning outcomes and a common text. See specific senior capstone course descriptions in disciplines. Prerequisites: Completion of CORE or Discipline Specific 379 and discipline specific prerequisites.


    Section-Specific Descriptions:
    ART 479 CORE: The Role of the Artist/Designer in Contemporary Society
     

    3 credits
    This course is the culminating experience for the Fine Arts and Graphic Design major as well as the core curriculum. This course will consist of readings, reflection, and discussion of texts which will address the role of the artist/designer in history as a purveyor of information about society and as a creative social catalyst in contemporary society. Students will also be creating the conceptual framework for their Senior Thesis Exhibition including both the material form and the written text. They will be applying the knowledge base gained through their prior courses to their own individual major body of work as well as peer mentoring others in the class and engaging in a group project in the community.


    BUS 479 CORE: Strategic Management  

    3 credits
    This course is the capstone learning experience for business administration, international business, finance, and accounting majors. It encourages a reflective search for truth in enterprise while focusing on how firms formulate, implement, and evaluate strategies. The course is designed to integrate student‘s functional business knowledge including ethical considerations through an engagement with a significant research project. The major learning challenge for students in this course will be to make and justify, through oral and written communication, subjective strategic decisions informed by extensive analysis and supported by the application of a variety of strategic tools. Finally, this course partners with the Career Development Center to provide students learning modules on resume preparation, etiquette, dress, and informational interviewing. Prerequisites: Completion of junior core seminar; BUS 220, 240, 343, 345; FIN 325.

    CIS 479 Capstone Seminar3 credits
    This seminar will offer a capstone experience in the student’s own discipline within mathematics and computer information systems, as well as a capstone experience in the core curriculum. As a culminating experience in the discipline, this course will require each student to engage in a discipline-specific project under the supervision of a faculty member within the student’s own discipline. In addition, students will be asked to ponder and discuss topics relevant to all scientific endeavors. Such topics include, but are not limited to, nature of proof and research ethics. As a capstone for the core curriculum, this seminar will provide a setting for students to read and discuss texts which raise questions related to human nature, common good, justice, ethics, scientific expertise, and search for knowledge in the contexts of scientific research and technological development. Interdisciplinary communication will be emphasized throughout the course. Prerequisite: Completion of junior core seminar.

    COM 479 CORE: Reflections on Truth: Rhetorical Analysis
    3 credits
    As a capstone in Communication Studies, this course will investigate and analyze the use of rhetoric in the contemporary world, to messages in the social world, the political world, and the commercial world. Plato saw rhetoric as “the winning of the soul by discourse.” The Roman orator, Quintilian, saw rhetoric as “a good man speaking well.” What did Plato mean by “winning the soul?” What does “speaking well” mean? The fundamental question will be, “How do we, in the 21st century, seek the truth through our communication with each other?” Prerequisites: Completion of Junior Core seminar; junior standing; COM 105, 132, 252, 260, and 348.


    CRJ 479 CORE: Criminal Justice Seminar  

    3 credits
    This senior capstone seminar integrates theory and research to analyze selected contemporary criminal justice issues. Students will synthesize knowledge from previous coursework in the major and core curriculum to examine the origin, impact and implications of criminal justice policies. Pre-requisite: Completion of junior core seminar, senior standing, and completion of at least two courses in criminal justice or consent of instructor.


    ECN 479 CORE: Economic Analysis  

    3 credits
    This senior seminar examines truth by applying economic analysis to current issues and problems. It explores and develops perspectives on prevailing economic questions by collecting, analyzing, and interpreting economic data and information. The capstone continues the discussion in the previous course seminars through critical evaluation of economic relations within a global community. Prerequisites: Completion of junior core seminar and ECN 322 or 325.


    EDU 479A CORE: Intervention Specialist  

    3 credits
    This course will critically examine truth from an educator‘s perspective. Truths become evident when we critically examine questions of depth in education from multiple perspectives. In addition to the core seminar questions, other possible topics include classroom diversity and culture, collaboration among multiple stakeholders, and schooling as seen through the eyes of our learners. Co-requisite: EDU 480.


    EDU 479B CORE: Early Childhood  

    3 credits
    This course will critically examine truth from an educator‘s perspective. Truths become evident when we critically examine questions of depth in education from multiple perspectives. In addition to the core seminar questions, other possible topics include classroom diversity and culture, collaboration among multiple stakeholders, and schooling as seen through the eyes of our learners. Co-requisite: EDU 482.


    EDU 479C CORE: Middle Childhood  

    3 credits
    This course will critically examine truth from an educator‘s perspective. Truths become evident when we critically examine questions of depth in education from multiple perspectives. In addition to the core seminar questions, other possible topics include classroom diversity and culture, collaboration among multiple stakeholders, and schooling as seen through the eyes of our learners. Co-requisite: EDU 484.


    ENG 479 CORE: Literature Theory/Practice  

    3 credits
    This course offers students the opportunity to develop their professional, career, writing, and analytic skills through a variety of assignments. Students will not only read great works of literature, they will also learn about career development and the world of literary theory in order to better prepare them for the more advanced research activities of graduate and professional schools. The course is organized around issues regarding literature and the acquisition of knowledge. How do we know what we know? What is art? Who determines the canon and/or a great work of art? What is literary theory and interpretation? And, importantly, how have these questions been answered differently throughout the ages. The literature readings have been chosen to illustrate the close relationship, rather than the divisions, between literature and theory. In the end, the course asks students to 1) determine the truths they have learned about literature, and 2) examine how they know or came to know these truths. Prerequisites: Completion of junior core seminar, junior status, or permission of instructor and ENG 205.


    HST 479 CORE: History Matters/Senior Seminar  

    3 credits
    This seminar in history is designed to help the more advanced student study the meaning and practice of history through historiography and directed research. The 'History Matters' theme will be interpreted from two perspectives: a) the basic 'matters' of history: practicing the historian‘s craft, which includes searching, discovering, questioning, analyzing, and interpreting various kinds of historical sources, as well as developing one‘s own synthesis and presenting it credibly; and b) exploring the significance and relevance of the past, based on the moral conviction that history does, in fact, 'matter'—both to those who formally study the past, and to society as a whole. By studying historiography—the writing of history by famous historians in the past—and the philosophies of history, we shall obtain a more informed perspective on present controversies surrounding the teaching of history and the interpretations of the past in the American political arena. The apex of the course will be researching and writing a major paper, and sharing the results with colleagues.

     

    MTH 479 Capstone Seminar
    3 credits
    This seminar will offer a capstone experience in the student’s own discipline within mathematics and computer information systems, as well as a capstone experience in the core curriculum. As a culminating experience in the discipline, this course will require each student to engage in a discipline-specific project under the supervision of a faculty member within the student’s own discipline. In addition, students will be asked to ponder and discuss topics relevant to all scientific endeavors. Such topics include, but are not limited to, nature of proof and research ethics. As a capstone for the core curriculum, this seminar will provide a setting for students to read and discuss texts which raise questions related to human nature, common good, justice, ethics, scientific expertise, and search for knowledge in the contexts of scientific research and technological development. Interdisciplinary communication will be emphasized throughout the course. Prerequisite: Completion of junior core seminar. This course does not fulfill the mathematics general distribution requirement.

    PJU 479 CORE: International Conflict Management: Diplomacy, Democratization, Development  

    3 credits
    This course focuses on the non-violent management of conflict at the intra state, regional and international levels based on concepts of justice and the common good. Particular attention is given to current areas of international conflict and what students have learned at ODU about the most ethical options for resolving these conflicts. The role of individuals, political leaders, economic and political systems, civil society organizations, regional organizations, and international institutions such as the United Nations are explored in relation to the prevention of war and peace building post conflict. The course explores conflict management strategies such as preventative diplomacy, arms control and disarmament, economic sanctions, international law, UN peacekeeping, sustainable economic development, democratization, conflict resolution and reconciliation post conflict. Prerequisites: Completion of junior core seminar; POL 360 and 379C.


    PHL 479 CORE: Metaphysics  

    3 credits
    An examination of the ultimate causes of things and of how the search for truth in philosophy complements the search for truth in other disciplines and in the core seminars. Open to majors and non-majors who have an interest in metaphysical issues, such as whether we can prove that God exists, what types of things are real, and how metaphysics is related to the natural sciences. Prerequisites: Completion of junior core seminar; one prior philosophy course other than PHL 101.


    POL 479 CORE: Courage and Prudence in Modern Politics  

    3 credits
    This capstone course will consider in depth 18th and 20th century examples of political courage and prudence or their absence. Along with justice and moderation, a consideration of these virtues was traditionally considered part of any adequate political analysis. Contemporary political science substitutes terms like character and leadership while tending to focus more on interests and incentives. The classic questions are thereby evaded, but new ones emerge. Through the analysis of specific cases, the seminar will invite students to compare and contrast traditional and modern points of view and the distinct questions they bring to the fore. In that way the seminar aims to deepen students‘ understanding of political science as the 'architectonic science' among allied disciplines. Prerequisite: Completion of junior core seminar.


    PSY 479 CORE: Current Issues in Psychology  

    3 credits
    An exploration of current topics in psychology in the context of enduring issues related to human nature, common good, justice, and truth finding. Empirical capstone projects emphasize the syntheses of knowledge from psychology‘s past and present, skill in research methodology, and the appropriate application of psychological science for wellbeing. Prerequisites: Completion of junior core seminar; PSY 100, 230, an additional 12 credits in psychology beyond the 100-level, and senior standing or consent of the instructor.


    PRS 479 CORE: Analysis and Experience  

    3 credits
    This course serves as the senior capstone seminar and learning experience for public relations majors. It moves students through a reflective search for truth in the practice of public relations while focusing on how firms create, implement, and evaluate public relations strategies. The course is designed to integrate students‘ functional public relations knowledge including ethical considerations through an engagement with a supervised field placement involving a minimum of 80 hours in an approved Public Relations setting. The major learning challenge for students in this course will be to examine the organization they are working for or another organization and make and justify, through oral and written communication, subjective strategic decisions centered on the intersection of human nature, community, justice, and truth within the practice of public relations. Students are expected to make a professional contribution to the placement agency and to develop their own portfolio. This course will provide students learning modules on resume preparation, etiquette, dress and informational interviewing. Prerequisites: Completing of junior core seminar; senior standing; 24 semester hours in Public Relations coursework; 2.5 GPA in major courses.


    SCI 479 CORE: Research in the Sciences  

    3 credits
    This seminar will offer a capstone experience in the student‘s own discipline within mathematics, computer and natural sciences as well as a capstone experience in the core curriculum. As a culminating experience in the discipline, this course will require each student to engage in a discipline-specific project under the supervision of a faculty adviser within the student‘s own discipline. In addition, students will be asked to ponder and discuss topics relevant to all scientific endeavors. Such topics include, but are not limited to, the scientific method, nature of proof, and research ethics. As a capstone for the core curriculum, this seminar will provide a setting for students to read and discuss texts which raise questions related to human nature, common good, justice, ethics, scientific expertise, and search for knowledge, in the contexts of scientific research and technological development. Interdisciplinary communication will be emphasized throughout the course. Prerequisite: Completion of junior core seminar. This course does not fulfill the Natural Science requirement.


    SWK 479A CORE: Social Work Seminar I  

    3 credits
    The capstone Fieldwork Seminar provides a systematic opportunity to connect the undergraduate senior field work practice experience with the academic program. The purpose of the Seminar is to provide students with an opportunity to share their field work experiences and to explore in some depth competencies in practice ('What truths have we learned?'). The Seminar will extend the discussion of self in the context of identifying as a professional social worker and conducting oneself accordingly. The discussion of the common good will be extended in the context of engaging, assessing, intervening, and evaluating with individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities. The seminar will extend the discussion of justice in the context of advancing human rights and social and economic justice. Co-requisite: Enrollment in SWK 480.

     
    SWK 479B CORE: Social Work Seminar II  

    3 credits
    Building upon entry-level competencies acquired during the first semester of this two semester Seminar, capstone fieldwork Seminar II provides a systematic opportunity to connect the undergraduate senior field work practice experience with the academic program. The purpose of the Seminar is to provide students with an opportunity to share their field work experiences and to explore in some depth competencies in practice ('What have we learned?'). The Seminar will extend the discussion of self in the context of identifying as a professional social worker and conducting oneself accordingly. The discussion of the common good will be extended in the context of engaging, assessing, intervening, and evaluating with individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities. The seminar will extend the discussion of justice in the context of advancing human rights and social and economic justice. Co-requisite: Enrollment in SWK 481.

     
    SOC 479 CORE: Sociological Theory  

    3 credits
    An analysis and integration of major theorists and theoretical schools in historical and contemporary social thought. Underlying themes include human nature, the structure and functioning of social groupings, and the articulation of individual and society. This course is a macroscopic, systemic analysis of human behavior which both focuses on and makes connections between/among concepts of self, community, justice and truth. Prerequisite: Completion of junior core seminar.


    SPM 479 CORE: Reflections on Truth: Sport Leadership and Ethics  

    3 credits
    In this capstone seminar, multiple theoretical perspectives on sport leadership and ethics will be examined. As the culmination of coursework for Sport Management majors and the core curriculum, students will explore ethical leadership taking into account human nature and leading for the common good. Professional ethics, rights, justice, and responsibilities in sport leadership will also be discussed. Students will utilize scholarly research to recognize and critically analyze moral issues to develop a personal approach of social responsibility in sport leadership settings. Prerequisites: Completion of junior seminar and SPM 296.


    THL 479 CORE: Readings in Theology  

    3 credits
    This is a capstone course for the major which also represents the culmination of Ohio Dominican University‘s core seminars. The seminar will extend the discussion of self, common good, and justice to address the question, 'What have we learned?' in the context of the major. This course serves as a synthetic overview of the Theology Major Program. Themes and readings, selected by the instructor, will include both the fundamental texts of the Tradition of Catholic Theology and provocative books and essays that suggest new directions for the future. Prerequisites: Completion of the junior core seminar and discipline specific prerequisites.