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    Course Descriptions


    HST 106 World History I  

    3 credits
    A study of the World history from the dawn of civilization to the early modern period. Areas of focus include the Near East, China, India, Japan, sub-Saharan Africa, Europe, and the Americas.


    HST 107 World History II  

    3 credits
    A continuation of World history from 1500 to the present in terms of the political, cultural, social, scientific, and religious events that have produced the Modern World. Special emphasis will be given to the development of nation-states and their policies of imperialism, the scientific and technological revolution, political and social revolutions, World War, capitalism, and the emergence of the global economy.


    HST 110 Western Civilization I  

    3 credits
    This course is an introduction to the history of Western Civilization, beginning with a study of the contributions made by Greece and Rome, and continuing with the development of Western society in Medieval Europe, the Renaissance, and the period of exploration and conquest. Not open to students with credit in HST 231.


    HST 111 Western Civilization II  

    3 credits
    A study of modern European civilization from the 17th Century through World War I through selected areas of study: e.g., imperialism, the rise of the nation-state, political economy, revolution, the breakdown of religion as a unifying idea. Not open to students with credit in HST 232.


    HST 131 Far East: Beginning to Present  

    3 credits
    A study of China, Japan, Korea, and Southeast Asia with emphasis on the political, economic, and cultural history, and the impact of Western contacts on these nations.


    HST 201 American History I  

    3 credits
    An analysis of the colonial heritage of the United States, the causes and consequences of the American Revolution, the political, social, and economic development of the new nation through the Civil War and its aftermath. Not open to students who have taken HST 120.


    HST 202 American History II  

    3 credits
    An analysis of the rise of big business, the labor movement, the emergence of the United States as a world power; the Progressive Reform movement; World War I, the Great Depression, World War II and the Cold War era. Not open to students who have taken HST 121.


    HST 215 Issues in History  

    3 credits
    This course will examine selected issues in the study of history. Topics may vary with each offering and partially satisfy one of the three concentrations in history. This course may be repeated when the topic has changed.


    HST/SOC 226 The Ethnic Experience in America  

    3 credits
    A study of Native American and non-English speaking immigrant ethnic groups within the development of the U.S. with specific attention to the issues of dominant and minority relations, assimilation or ethnic pluralism and culture, color, gender, and social class as negative or positive factors in ethnic relations.

     
    HST 230 History of Latin America  

    3 credits
    A study of patterns in the conquest and colonization of Latin America and the continuity and change in these patterns from independence and national consolidation through contemporary struggles with socio-economic and political development.

     
    HST 245 The Middle East and Islam  

    3 credits
    An exploration of the historical, religious, social, and political factors that have produced the contemporary Islamic Middle Eastern world. Special consideration will be given to Islam as one of the three great Western religions. Not open to students with credit for HST 348d.


    HST 279A CORE: History of Western Monasticism  

    3 credits
    This seminar explores the history of monastic communities from their earliest development to the end of the Middle Ages. Particular attention will be paid to communal life in Judaism and early Christianity, the development of coenobitism in Egypt and Greece, the institutionalization of Western monasticism, ninth and twelfth-century reforms, and the rise of the mendicant orders in the twelfth and thirteenth century. Comparison will also be made to traditions of communal life in other World religions. Over the course of the seminar students will consider the paradox of the anti-social community, the pursuits of active and contemplative life, the practicalities of stability, recruitment and governance, and issues of luminosity and marginalization. Prerequisite: CORE 179 or appropriate transfer status. This course fulfills the Arts requirement (History).


    HST/ART/POL 279C CORE: American Political Thought: Nature and the Common Good  

    3 credits
    A study of the concept of nature as used in Anglo-American thought and how these usages influence an understanding of the natural, social, and political environments of the United States. Special emphasis given to American political theory, its illustration through the 19th century American landscape movement, and the inability of U.S. thinkers to appreciate the common good. Not open to students with credit in POL/HST/ART-335 or POL-348F.


    HST 305 The Ancient World  

    3 credits
    A study of the foundations of Western civilization, with special emphasis on the ancient Near East, Greece, and Rome.


    HST 317 Europe in the Age of Revolutions  

    3 credits
    A study of the major revolutionary movements in early modern Europe (1500-1890). Selected topics include the period of religious wars, movements of scientific inquiry, the enlightenment, ideological and political revolutions, industrialism, and imperialism. Not open to students with credit in HST-211.

     
    HST 320 Twentieth-Century America  

    3 credits
    A study of the political, economic, and social changes in the United States in the twentieth century and the role of the United States in international affairs. The thematic focus will be on the extent and speed of the changes in the World War II era, which laid the foundations for many of the present day challenges presented by issues of race, gender and class. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.


    HST 330 World Powers in the Twentieth Century  

    3 credits
    A study of the interactions of the major world powers in the twentieth century with emphasis on the developments following World War I through the current challenges posed by the concept of a "global" community and economy. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.


    HST/THL 342 History of Christianity in the United States  

    3 credits
    A historical overview of the religious life, institutions, and thoughts of Americans from colonial times to the present with a special emphasis on the Catholic Church in the United States. Note: In the previous Core Curriculum, HST/THL 342 does not fulfill the core requirement in theology unless one additional course in theology is also taken. This course fulfills the diversity, global, and multicultural requirement.


    HST/POL 348E A History of U.S. Foreign Relations  

    3 credits
    A study of the relationship between major expressions of U.S. foreign policy and the American ethos in the context of historic foreign policy challenges. Prerequisites: ENG 101-102 or 110-111.


    HST 348F History and Technology  

    3 credits
    A consideration of the technological forces in human history through the study of selected social issues and the reading of primary texts.


    HST 350 Medieval Europe  

    3 credits
    A study of Europe from 500-1500 tracing the development of medieval civilization through its apex and decline. Special consideration will be given to the artistic, intellectual, religious, social, and political events, which created the great European age of transition from the Ancient to the Modern worlds.

     
    HST 352 Modern Europe  

    3 credits
    A study of Europe from 1890 to the present, tracing the transformation of Europe from the center to the periphery of world power. Topics to be discussed include Imperialism, World War, ideological conflicts, economic revival and unification, reemergence of nationalism and regionalism, and the dissolution of communism.


    HST/POL 365 The United States Presidency  

    3 credits
    A study of the American Presidency – often described as 'the most powerful political office in the world'- and the men who have occupied it. An analysis of the continuity and change in the institution since it was created by the Founding Fathers at the Constitutional Convention. The historical focus will be on the emergence of the Modern Presidency during the twentieth century. Prerequisite: POL 290.


    HST 370 Africa and America: The Uneasy Partnership  

    3 credits
    Survey of the relationship between Africa, Europe and the Americas; examination of the cultures and histories of sub-Saharan Africa, the development of the slave trade, the middle passage, chattel slavery in the U.S., the Civil War and Reconstruction, racial thought in the U.S. from 1877, the Civil Rights Movement, the development of pluralism and contemporary issues of diversity in U.S. culture.


    HST/CRJ 379A/POL 379D CORE: Justice, Rights, Liberty  

    3 credits
    The search for justice in terms of the development of civil rights in the United States. Readings, discussions, and debate on the concept of justice; examination of history, substance, and value of civil rights—with special attention paid to the Bill of Rights; focus on the Civil Rights Movement (race and gender) as a case study. Prerequisites: CORE 179 or appropriate transfer status; ENG 102 or ENG 111. This course fulfills the Arts requirement (HST) or partially fulfills the Social and Behavioral Science requirement (POL/CRJ). Not open to students with credit in POL/CRJ 232. This course fulfills the diversity, global, and multicultural requirement.


    HST 379B CORE: Slavery and Freedom: The Paradox of American History  

    3 credits
    This course will examine the central paradox of American History—Slavery and Freedom—around the central event of the Civil War. Although the focus will be on history, literary works will be assigned as well (i.e., Shelby Foote, Ambrose Bierce, Toni Morrison, along with great primary documents such as the Declaration of Independence, Paine‘s Common Sense, Frederick Douglas, and the speeches of Abraham Lincoln (exemplary in terms of literary style as well as substance)). Prerequisites: CORE 179 or appropriate transfer status; ENG 102 or ENG 111. This course fulfills the Arts requirement (History). Not open to students with credit in HST 348C or HST 344-345.


    HST 379C CORE: Columbus Urban History 

    3 credits
    This course addresses justice in the context of Columbus's urban history. Prerequisites: CORE 179 or appropriate transfer status; ENG 102 or ENG 111.

     
    HST 479 CORE: History Matters/Senior Seminar  

    3 credits
    This seminar in history is designed to help the more advanced student study the meaning and practice of history through historiography and directed research. The 'History Matters theme will be interpreted from two perspectives: a) the basic 'matters' of history: practicing the historian‘s craft, which includes searching, discovering, questioning, analyzing, and interpreting various kinds of historical sources, as well as developing one‘s own synthesis and presenting it credibly; and b) exploring the significance and relevance of the past, based on the moral conviction that history does, in fact, 'matter'—both to those who formally study the past, and to society as a whole. By studying historiography—the writing of history by famous historians in the past—and the philosophies of history, we shall obtain a more informed perspective on present controversies surrounding the teaching of history and the interpretations of the past in the American political arena. The apex of the course will be researching and writing a major paper, and sharing the results with colleagues.


    HST 1/2/3/485 Special Topics  

    3 credits
    Intensive reading and class discussion of selected topics in history not covered in regular courses.


    HST 2/3/486 Independent Study  

    3 credits
    Intensive individual work in an area of history. Includes Honors Program research. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor, academic advisor, division chairperson.


    HST 498 Seminar  

    3 credits
    As a capstone course this is a study of the meaning and practice of history through directed research and historiography with emphasis on the integration of social studies theories, themes, concepts and facts (American and world) in diverse historical and social settings.